top of page
Search

Implant Maintenance: My go-to instruments


Dental implants require constant maintenance and monitoring. This further involves assessing the patient's general and oral health, professional implant maintenance, and diligent patient home care as critical factors that will ensure the long-term success of implants and a predictable replacement for natural teeth.
Dental implants require constant maintenance and monitoring. This further involves assessing the patient's general and oral health, professional implant maintenance, and diligent patient home care as critical factors that will ensure the long-term success of implants and a predictable replacement for natural teeth.

The proper care of implants requires knowledge and the use of specific tools and techniques to ensure effective cleaning and maintenance without causing any harm to the implant surface. If we do not choose the proper tools or techniques, it can lead to complications such as roughening or contamination of the surfaces, which may ultimately affect the success of the implant. Therefore, dental professionals must understand the tools and methods for maintaining implants.



Here is my go-to set of instruments for dental implant care:


One essential tool used in the care of implants is called the Wingrove Kit. This kit consists of a set of titanium instruments that are specially processed to prevent any scratching on the implants. The instruments in the Wingrove Kit can also be sharpened to remove deposits without causing any damage to the implant surface. Dental professionals who are involved in maintaining implants find this kit indispensable.


Alongside the Wingrove Kit, another essential set of instruments used for care is known as the Pinyero Kit. The Pinyero Kit includes four instruments specifically designed to address difficulties related to hygiene access during fixed restorations. This is a fantastic kit for hybrid dental implant cases like All-on-X, fixed prosthetics, and even implant-supported bridges.


These tools are crucial, for removing hard deposits like calculus or cement around the implant, which helps decrease the chances of complications arising from implant care.


When it comes to ultrasonic tips, dental professionals should rely on tips like the PI Max for the Piezon device from EMS. The PI Max is specifically designed to reduce biofilm and remove calculus below the gumline without causing harm to the dental implant surfaces. This approach ensures a preventive method that maximizes patient comfort while preserving the implant surface's integrity.


For removing soft deposits, my go-to tool is the AirFlow Prophylaxis Master with Erythritol. This device is part of a protocol called Guided Biofilm Therapy (GBT) which offers a pain-free treatment option that's minimally invasive for all patients. By utilizing this protocol, most soft deposits can be effectively removed without causing any damage to the surface, thereby reducing complications associated with poor implant hygiene. My goal is to ONLY manage soft deposits. I want to reduce the times that I put a tool to implant. That is why I focus so much on Steps 2 and 3 of GBT-- Disclose and Motivate. I want to find the reason calculus is forming and help guide the patient to products and protocols that will work to reduce the formation of hard deposits.


It's crucial to understand that these tools are selected with care to ensure they do not harm the surface of implants. Therefore dental professionals must receive training in utilizing these tools safely as part of their clinical practice.


In summary, taking care of implants involves using tools and equipment for both professional and at-home maintenance. It is crucial to clean and maintain the implants effectively without harming their surface. By employing certain techniques and tools, dental experts can ensure the long-term viability of implants while minimizing the chances of complications arising from inadequate implant hygiene.



Helpful links:


PubMed Central (PMC)

Peri-implant disease is usually caused by the accumulation of dental biofilm around the implant, and this biofilm can irradiate the gingiva tissue, which leads to inflammation and, more severely, to a deterioration of the bone structure. There is a concern ... (174 kB)

Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth.

4 views0 comments
bottom of page